Faculty

Allison Young


Assistant Professor



225-578-5400 |
young3@lsu.edu

Art History BA Brandeis University
MA Institute of Fine Arts, New York University
PhD Institute of Fine Arts, New York University



Allison Young is assistant professor of contemporary art history at LSU. A specialist in postcolonial and contemporary art of the Global South, she received her B.A. (2009) in Art History and Anthropology from Brandeis University, and her M.A. (2012) and Ph.D. (2017) from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. Young’s research centers primarily on African and African-Diasporic artists and art histories, with focus on South African art, British art and visual culture, biennials and curatorial practice, and questions surrounding migration, transnationalism and political engagement in contemporary art. She has previously taught courses in art and design history and theory at Parsons, The New School for Design, and Loyola University, New Orleans.

Young has published scholarly articles on South African artists Gavin Jantjes (Art Journal, 2017) and Penny Siopis (Contemporaneity: Historical Presence in Visual Culture, 2015).  She has also contributed writing to numerous exhibition catalogues, including an extended essay on the work of Remy Jungerman for The Measurement of Presence, the Dutch Pavilion at the 58th Venice Biennale (2019); on Robert Pruitt for Queen: From the Collection of CCH Pounder (2018); on Juliana Huxtable for Out of Easy Reach (2018); and on several international artists for the Short Guide of All the World’s Futures, the 56th Venice Biennale (2015). Her arts criticism has been featured on platforms such as Artforum.com, Apollo International, ART AFRICA Magazine and Wallpaper*, and she has served as Contributing Editor of Global Modern and Contemporary Art for Smarthistory since 2015.

Before joining LSU, Young was Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellow for Modern and Contemporary Art at the New Orleans Museum of Art, where she curated and published an exhibition catalogue for Lina Iris Viktor: A Haven. A Hell. A Dream Deferred (2018). Her current book project focuses on the work of the London-based, Ugandan-Asian artist Zarina Bhimji and the shifting discourses surrounding identity politics, abstraction and the “global” in late 20th century British art.